MLA Auction 50 – Fall 2020 – Bottles

Closed Sat Oct 31 at 6pm ET.

BT001 Eatons Erie Pint
Minimum Bid: $1500
Range:$2000-3000
Sold: $2000

The Erie Glassworks of Port Colborne Ontario operated for just five years, 1893-98. At some point, they got a contract to make fruit jars for the T. Eaton Company. Embossed with the Erie Fruit Jar trademark on the front and The T. Eaton Co Limited Toronto on the back. We are pleased to offer a near mint example of the rare pint. Tiny potstone off the “R” in “Jar” with two tiny legs off. This is literally a speck. Otherwise this jar is excellent. Perfectly clean aqua coloured glass. Well ground lip. Strong embossing. First one we have offered in 25 years!



BT002 Beehive Pint SCA
Minimum Bid: $750
Range:$1200-1500
Sold: $1500

The Beehive pint is one of Canada’s most popular jars. This example has turned a deep lovely amethyst colour from long exposure to sunlight. Condition is near mint with just a wisp of internal stain. Plain aqua glass insert and a decent band.


BT003 Beehive Quart
Minimum Bid: $150
Range:$200-300
Sold: $500

A Beehive quart in pale blue coloured glass. Well embossed. Mint condition. If you have wanted one, this is as good as they come.


BT004 Acme Star Mason Pint
Minimum Bid: $250
Range:$400-500
Sold: $800

A pint size Acme Star Mason. Aqua coloured glass. There is damage to the ground lip rear, three deep 1/4″ flakes and a single chip same size. I strongly suspect this is damage from when the jar was ground. Otherwise this jar is spectacularly clean. Like the day it was made. Whittled and crude as they come. Great folds in the glass on both side seams. Original lid with Consolidated Fruit Jar Company milkglass insert. A beautiful example of this scarce jar.


BT005 Acme Star Mason 1/2 Gal
Minimum Bid: $200
Range:$300-400
Sold: $750

A 1/2 gal size Acme Star Mason. Aqua coloured glass with a wicked heavy line of amber glass that loops around the shoulder. Mint condition. Mason shoulder seal. Consolidated Fruit Jar Co insert. This is the best example of this scarce jar I have handled.


BT006 Acme Star Mason Quart
Minimum Bid: $100
Range:$150-200
Sold: $160

A quart size Acme Star Mason. Aqua coloured glass. Crude glass with a great swirl around the body. Light stain. Well ground lip. Overall excellent condition. Mason shoulder seal. Boyd’s Genuine insert.


BT007 No Dot Crown Pint
Minimum Bid: $250
Range:$400-500
Sold: $325

A pint size No Dot Crown pint. Super clean jar. Brilliant aqua glass. Four tiny flakes off the ground lip. Correct lid and band. A real nice example of this scarce jar.



BT008 Canada Compass Quart
Minimum Bid: $150
Range:$200-300
Sold: $450

A quart size Canada Compass jar. Rich aqua coloured glass. Near mint example. Lots of character to the glass, with a deep sag on the right side and an almost orange-peel like texture in places. Well embossed. Couple of minor grinding flakes. Not the correct lid. A real good example of this scarce jar.


BT009 Canada Compass 1/2 Gal
Minimum Bid: $100
Range:$150-200
Sold: $100

A 1/2 gal Canada Compass quart. Pale aqua coloured glass. Heavy chip off the mouth edge and resulting 2″ crack down the back. Weak embossing, fairly typical of this bottle. Not the correct lid. Displays well.


BT010 Acme Seal Pint
Minimum Bid: $75
Range:$100-150
Sold: $110

An Acme Seal pint in suncast amethyst coloured glass. A scarce Canadian jar. Possibly made by the Beausejour Glassworks, Manitoba (1906-1913). Near mint condition. Plain aqua glass insert and band.


BT011 Pilgrim & Co – Hamilton
Minimum Bid: $1000
Range:$1500-2000
Sold: $1250

Last auction, we sold a rare example of this cobalt blue squat style Pilgrim & Co soda from Hamilton Canada West. That was the first one we have ever offered. Then last Summer, I got a text from a construction worker which included a pic of the same style of bottle, freshly plucked from the site. While this is the same style of bottle, it is not the same colour. The blue of this one is visibly darker and a different tone. Note the neck is also quite a bit shorter. All these bottles are quite squat, but this one is especially so. When dug, it was heavily stained. I had it professionally tumbled and it came out great. There is still some ground wear and an open bubble on the heel, but the stain is completely gone. Iron pontiled but no iron remains. A rare, early, coloured, Canada West era squat soda.


BT012 Sproatt – Toronto
Minimum Bid: $600
Range:$1000-1200
Sold: $2000

Henry Sproatt is first listed in 1837 as a carter, then grocer & provisions merchant. In 1848, he started advertising himself as a ginger beer maker. He operated until 1862. Some of Canada’s rarest and most beautiful soda water bottles bear his name. This H. Sproatt torpedo in deep aqua coloured glass is an excellent example. Near mint condition with only the tiniest imperfections. Very light stain. While this bottle could be tumbled mint, I think it has a great original surface. Lots of whittle to the glass.


BT013 Eves – Toronto
Minimum Bid: $500
Range:$800-1000
Sold: $700

The Eves were a force in the early Canadian soda water business, running operations in multiple cities over many years. James Eves senior established both beer and ginger beer businesses in Belleville Canada West in 1847. Upon his death in 1855, James junior assumed ownership and continued the operation in Belleville. In 1859, he moved the business to Kingston and stayed until 1862. In 1862, James Jr moved to Toronto where he ran a successful soda water business for 20 years. While impossible to say for sure, collectors have generally accepted that the J Eves Soda Water Manr bottles with serifed letters were likely used when Eves was in Toronto in the early 1860s. This light cobalt blue J Eves is a gorgeous example. Well tumbled. The glass character is excellent and there is just a tiny bit of residual stain in the neck. There remains a fair bit of iron in the pontil. Tiny thin bruise off the inside blob edge. Otherwise excellent condition.


BT014 Eves – Toronto
Minimum Bid: $250
Range:$400-500
Sold: $400

The 1862 Eves bottles were almost certainly the first ones ordered by James Eves Jr when he moved his business to Toronto. Most of these are found in aqua coloured glass. This one is a lovely pale blue colour. These come both smooth-based and pontiled. This one has a smooth base. Heavy chipping to the blob edge, at the rear. Well tumbled. A tiny bit of ground wear, but very minor. One of the nicest 1862 Eves I have handled.


BT015 Eves – Toronto
Minimum Bid: $200
Range:$300-400
Sold: $275

An 1862 James Eves Jr torpedo from Toronto. This bottle was formerly in the Dean Axelson Collection and is pictured in his book. Heavy chipping to the blob edge. The body of the bottle is stained on the inside, while the neck and blob are clean. A good candidate for tumbling. A rare bottle in any condition.


BT016 Wilson – Toronto
Minimum Bid: $100
Range:$150-200
Sold: $170

Charles Wilson was one of Toronto’s most successful soda water makers and a fine collection can be assembled of his bottles. These split style sodas seem to have been popular for a relatively short-time around 1900-1910. Likely served as a mix with your booze of choice. Light internal stain. Some milky streaks in the neck which are impurities in the glass. Strongly embossed. A great example of this scarce bottle.


BT017 Green Canadian Coke
Minimum Bid: $100
Range:$150-200
Sold: $180

Canadian straight-sided cokes come in some amazing colours. This one is a deep green colour. Some case wear to the embossing in places and a few scrapes to the shoulder. Overall very good condition. A tough colour to find.


BT018 Bradleys – London CW
Minimum Bid: $2000
Range:$3000-4000
Sold: $2150

People ask why we don’t offer more early Canadian medicines? The answer is that aside from a couple of common types most are rare. This R.S. Bradley London Canada West is one of the rarest and best. Little is known about Bradley, as he never appears in any of the London city directories. In 1867, a notice in a London paper notes the sale of his tobacconist business to William Bowman Jr. Tobacconists sold luxury goods and likely this bottle contained a boozy cordial or bitters. The bottle was made by the Hamilton Glassworks and represents one of their earliest custom-made products. The glass is an amazing deep amber colour. The vast majority of early Canadian medicines are aqua, making this one of the very best. This is a tall narrow style of bottle that seems to have enjoyed popularity in Canada in the 1860s. It stands an impressive 13 3/4″ tall! Couple of nibbles off the mouth edge and some light stain in the lower body. Minor stuff. Overall excellent condition. If you collect the very best in early Canadian glass bottles, this one is top top shelf!



BT019 Briggs Black Oil – Hamilton CW
Minimum Bid: $200
Range:$300-400
Sold: $210

This Brigg’s Black Oil, Hamilton Canada West medicine is a beautiful early bottle. While little is known about this company, it was established in 1848. Aqua coloured glass. Recessed panels on two sides. Squarish body with a crudely laid-on lip. Smooth base. Light stain. No damage. Sweet crude early thing. 4 7/8″ tall.


BT020 Winer’s – Hamilton CW
Minimum Bid: $200
Range:$300-400
Sold: $375

John Winer established his drug business in Hamilton Canada West in 1830 and operated sucessfully for decades. His hoarhound syrup is advertised as early as 1846. This beautiful hinged-mold example likely dates to the 1860s. Aqua glass. Mint condition, retaining a partial and quite legible label. 4 3/4″ tall.


BT021 Blakeley – Napanee CW
Minimum Bid: $150
Range:$200-300
Sold: $210

James Blakeley had a drug business in early Napanee from 1857-1875. This smooth base bottle of his likely dates from the 1860s or early 70s. Super clean. Aqua glass. Great crudely applied-lip. Basically mint. 4 3/4″ tall.


BT022 Kennedy – Hamilton CW
Minimum Bid: $150
Range:$200-300
Sold: $210

An early medicine from J. Kennedy Hamilton Canada West. Recessed panels on three sides. Aqua glass. Excellent condition with a bit of light stain. 5 1/2″ tall.


BT023 Bews – Revelstoke
Minimum Bid: $1500
Range:$2000-3000
Sold: $2000

Poison bottles and fruit jars have a lot in common. They were generally made by glassworks for a wide distribution with most being generic forms. Generic because they were not marked for any particular merchant. To compete, glassworks made their own types to distinguish themselves and to attract customers. Poison makers took it one step further, making all kinds of unusual designs both as advertisements and a warning not to take accidentally. Because of these attributes, both poisons and fruit jars are collected internationally. The rarest and most attractive fetching high prices for this reason. The Whitall Tatum Company of Millville New Jersey were known for their pharmacy bottles, producing many fine examples for both American and Canadian druggists. They made a beautiful poison bottle in a form more typical of a drug bottle, embossed with a gruesome skull and crossbones. To my knowledge, only two versions of this rare poison were made. One for the Demert Drug & Chemical Co of Spokane, Washington and the other for the Bews Pharmacy of Revelstoke British Columbia. The Bews were made in two sizes. This is the largest one, 6 1/2″ tall. When I got this bottle, it had a large chip in the front of the lip that was poorly filled. I had it professionally repaired by Wil Martindale in the States, who does amazing work. There is no discernable difference in colour between the repair and the rest of the lip. No stain or other damage. This bottle now displays perfectly. An extremely rare bottle to find in any condition and the first we have sold in 25 years! Consider by many, myself included, to be Canada’s best poison.


BT024 1 oz Amber Rigo
Minimum Bid: $250
Range:$400-500
Sold: $400

The most common style of Canadian poison is a hexagonal bottle sometimes referred to as a coffin style. At first glance, these all look the same, but there are many varieties: B.F.G Co, Rigo, O.C.P, Diamond, Eatons. What they have in common is that nearly all were made from cobalt coloured glass. Canadian hex poisons in other colours, like amber and flint (clear) are rare. If you have seen an amber one, it is likely an Eatons. This 1 oz amber hex is not an Eatons poison. It is a Rigo with NOT TO BE TAKEN on the centre panel. Near mint with just the tiniest bit of stain. An extremely rare Canadian amber poison.


BT025 Pair of 1 oz Eatons
Minimum Bid: $100
Range:$150-200
Sold: $110

The standard Eatons hex poison is embossed on three panels: FOR EXTERNAL USE/POISON BE CAREFUL/USE WITH CAUTION. The bottle pictured on the right is the standard type. Note the one on the left is a rare variant with embossing only on the centre panel. Both are near mint.


BT027 Nova Scotia Poison
Minimum Bid: $50
Range:$75-100
Sold: $170

This unusual 1oz flatback poison made from aqua coloured glass is attributed to one of the Nova Scotia glassworks, either Humphreys or Lamont. Flat flake off the base edge rear that appears to be in-manufacturing. Light internal stain. A scarce poison and the first we have offered.


BT028 Threadless Insulator CD740
Minimum Bid: $300
Range:$400-600
Sold: $900

They are still out there. Just this past Summer, two blackglass threadless CD740s were found in an Ontario barn, just sitting on a beam. Where did they come from? Dug from a railway station dump long ago. Likely made by the Foster Brothers glassworks in Quebec, though unmarked. This CD740 is made from a deep amber glass that is virtually black. Note the longer skirt, thinner band and flat top. Reach inside and the top of the pin hole is smooth. Near mint condition. Crude as Hell! 3 3/4″ tall.


BT029 Threadless Insulator CD740
Minimum Bid: $100
Range:$150-200
Sold: $110

This CD740 has a distinctly rounded dome different in several ways: the dome is more rounded, the band is thicker and more rounded, and the skirt is considerably shorter. Feel inside the pin hole and there is a pronounced nipple. Deep green coloured glass that is nearly black. Huge chunk out of the skirt as well as a number of chips. Displays well from one side. 3 1/2″ tall.


BT030 Olivier – Sherbrooke
Minimum Bid: $100
Range:$150-200
Sold: Not

We end with a most unusual bottle. An applied-lip aqua glass whiskey. This is a big bottle, standing 10 5/8″ tall. Originally made as a private mould and embossed P. Olivier Sherbrooke PQ. Originally, because for some reason the glassworks peened out the writing. If you are not familiar with the term, peening is a process whereby the glassworks hammers out lettering in a mould. This was most often done to correct mistakes, which were common. I can only speculate that this mould was modified when Mr. Olivier decided not to order any more custom-made bottles. Embossed bottles from this company are extremely rare, with this being only the second one to surface. Suggesting Mr. Olivier was in business only a short time. Despite the peening, you can still make out the embossing quite clearly. The bottle itself is in excellent condition with just a bit of internal stain.